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Imagine No Malaria

Just a few short years ago, statistics showed a child died every 30 seconds of malaria. Today, because of your dedicated and generous support, malaria’s impact has been cut in half. According to the World Health Organization (World Malaria Report 2011), this disease now claims a life every 60 seconds. We seek to end all preventable deaths from malaria, so our journey continues….

For almost 200 years, The United Methodist Church has operated hospitals and clinics throughout Africa. Our facilities are a vital and trusted part of the healthcare delivery system on the continent. We are in many hard-to-reach places, beyond the reach of many aid organizations, sometimes even governments.

The Imagine No Malaria approach is focused on four key areas: prevention, education, communication and treatment.

Prevention: To date, Imagine No Malaria is responsible for the distribution of 1.2 million  insecticide-treated bed nets throughout the continent.  Will your gift help us reach 2 million nets to protect families and save lives?

Education: We know that local people are the most credible and trusted source for information about malaria. We have trained more than 5,400 community health workers to personally deliver mosquito nets and measure usage rates. Recent efforts in Sierra Leone and the Democratic Republic of Congo have produced net usage rates exceeding 80 percent.

Communication: Behavior-change communication includes how to use and care for a bed net, and when to seek treatment for the disease. In addition to word-of-mouth outreach, the United Methodist radio station in Cote d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) broadcasts messages about malaria to thousands of listeners each day.

Treatment: The United Methodist Church operates more than 300 hospitals, clinics and health posts throughout Africa. This vital healthcare infrastructure is a critical part of how we will overcome the disease. In order to be effective, however, these facilities must have life-saving resources like rapid diagnostic tests and malaria medication.

Working side-by-side with local communities, national departments of health, other nonprofit organizations (like Nets For LifeUNICEF, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies) is precisely the way we will beat this disease.

Want to know more?  Check out this map of UMC activities in Africa.

Imagine No Malaria – World Malaria Day – April 25, 2015

World Malaria Day - April 25, 2015

Imagine No Malaria Recognized as Superhero at Global Meeting

Imagine No Malaria 4Imagine No Malaria, an initiative of The United Methodist Church to prevent and treat malaria, has received a Superhero Award from the Rotarians Action Group on Malaria. The award was given during the recent annual meeting of the Alliance for Malaria Prevention in Geneva.

Imagine No Malaria, the only faith-based organization represented among the award recipients, was recognized for its grassroots efforts in reaching rural and hard-to-reach areas with its prevention methods.

Imagine No Malaria is committed to ending death and suffering from malaria through prevention, communication, trained health workers and facilities, and grassroots education. To date, INM has raised 86 percent of its goal with more than $65 million in gifts and pledges. United Methodists across the world are working hard to reach and celebrate the initiative’s $75 million goal before the denomination’s General Conference in 2016.

Safe, secure and easy giving opportunities are available on the site so that anyone can participate and join the effort to eliminate this disease. Visitors can make one-time gifts and pledges of any amount, but many individuals participate with a recurring pledge of $28 per month over three years, to potentially save the lives of up to 100 children at risk for contracting the deadly disease.

Additionally, visitors can get a glimpse at the lives Imagine No Malaria is changing through video diaries, touching photos and news stories.

 

 

WHO reports ‘dramatic’ decrease in malaria deaths

The number of people dying from malaria has fallen dramatically since 2000 and malaria cases also are steadily declining, according to the World Health Organization’s World Malaria Report 2014.

Between 2000 and 2013, the report says, the malaria mortality rate decreased by 47 percent worldwide. In the WHO African Region – where about 90 percent of malaria deaths occur – the decrease is 54 percent.

The Dec. 9 report estimates that, globally, 670 million fewer cases and 4.3 million fewer malaria deaths occurred between 2001 and 2013 than would have occurred had incidence and mortality rates remained unchanged since 2000.

Abdul and Maseray Koroma stand with their daughter, Kelvin, 9 months, beside the new insecticide-treated mosquito net they received from the Imagine No Malaria campaign.

Abdul and Maseray Koroma stand with their daughter, Kelvin, 9 months, beside the new insecticide-treated mosquito net they received from the Imagine No Malaria campaign.

The use of insecticide-treated bed nets is one important reason for the drop, the report said. Between 2000 and 2013, access to bed nets increased substantially.

In 2013, 49 percent of all people at risk of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa had access to an insecticide-treated net — a marked increase from just 3 percent in 2004. This trend is set to continue, with a record 214 million bed nets scheduled for delivery to endemic countries in Africa by year-end.

Since April 2010, The United Methodist Church’s Imagine No Malaria initiative has distributed more than 2.3 million bed nets, and is less than $10 million shy of its goal to raise $75 million by 2015 to dramatically reduce deaths and suffering in Africa.

“In the countries where we work, national net coverage averages range from about 50 percent to 90 percent,” said Dr. Olusimbo Ige, director of Global Health at the United Methodist Board of Global Ministries.

The church’s work has targeted communities where access to nets is low. “Our grants in the last two years have contributed to increasing net ownership to 98 percent in Bo district in Sierra Leone, 90 percent in Maniema (Democratic Republic of Congo) and 90 percent in Yei, South Sudan,” Ige said.

Acting in partnership

The Rev. Gary Henderson, executive director for Global Health Initiatives for United Methodist Communications, said The United Methodist Church has been a good international partner in this global effort.

“Reduction of death from malaria is only possible on this scale because of the integration of efforts. This report helps us to know that we are on the right path and should inspire United Methodist to stay the course,” he explained.

The malaria-specific Millennium Development Goal to halt and begin to reverse the incidence of malaria by 2015 already has been met in 64 countries. In 2013, two countries reported zero indigenous cases for the first time, and 11 countries succeeded in maintaining zero cases. Another four countries reported fewer than 10 local cases annually.

Despite these victories, malaria remains a major threat and greater global commitment is necessary for success. In 2013, one-third of households in areas with malaria transmission in sub-Saharan Africa did not have a single insecticide treated net, the report noted. Approximately $5.1 billion is needed annually to achieve malaria control and, eventually, elimination but current annual funds remain around $2.7 billion.

“We can win the fight against malaria,” said Dr. Margaret Chan, WHO director-general. “We have the right tools and our defenses are working, but we still need to get those tools to a lot more people if we are to make these gains sustainable.”

 

Giving Tuesday - Thank You

Thank you for making #GivingTuesday a very good day for The United Methodist Church and the many missions we initiate, grow and support.

You did something important. You generously supported the Imagine No Malaria and ICT4D ministries of United Methodist Communications. Because of good wishes expressed through your giving, the communications agency of The United Methodist Church can continue to work on your behalf.

Struggling countries will continue to help people heal. Isolated communities will benefit from communications technology that provides help and hope. Families will be empowered to leave legacies of survival.

You helped your church, your global neighbors, Imagine No Malaria and ICT4D (Information & Communications Technology for Development). Jesus called us to “do unto others,” and you did. On #GivingTuesday, angels in heaven and on earth jumped for joy.

We give thanks for you.

United Methodist Communications

Although #GivingTuesday is officially over, GivingAnyDay will always remain on the calendar.

GIVE NOW to Imagine No Malaria                 GIVE NOW to ICT4D

Thank You

 

 

Imagine No Malaria

Imagine No Malaria 4

Imagine No Malaria – Volunteers Arming Communities Against Malaria

Community health workers undergo training in the Kakua Chiefdom, outside Bo, Sierra Leone prior to a distribution of insecticide-treated mosquito nets by The United Methodist Church's Imagine No Malaria initiative.

Community health workers undergo training in the Kakua Chiefdom, outside Bo, Sierra Leone prior to a distribution of insecticide-treated mosquito nets by The United Methodist Church’s Imagine No Malaria initiative.

In a small, cramped schoolroom, in the chiefdom of Kakua, scores of dedicated volunteers are sitting elbow to elbow learning how to fight a deadly foe that creeps into their homes in the dead of night, often taking the lives of children under 5.

Armed with that knowledge, on June 5 they will start swarming every household within the 15 districts and capital city of Bo, handing out vouchers for insecticide-treated bed nets.  The nets will put a wall of protection between people and the deadly mosquito that transmits malaria — usually at night, when it is most active.

The United Methodist Church is working in partnership with the government of Sierra Leone to distribute more than 350,000 bed nets, along with vitamins and medicine for children under 5 in a massive campaign to eradicate malaria and keep children alive and healthy.

In Bo, 1,720 volunteers are going through this training in preparation for the launch of this life-saving program.

Many of the volunteers are health care workers, but teachers, pastors and even students also have been enlisted to make sure the area is covered and protected. The city has a population of 650,000, and the goal is to provide three bed nets per family, depending on how many people sleep in the house.

Ernest Jusu, a nurse working with The United Methodist Church’s Sierra Leone Annual (regional) Conference, is on the front lines of training these volunteers and helping them get the crucial supplies to areas that can only be reached by motorcycle or walking.

Health worker Juliana Koroma (right) takes a blood sample from Issata Jusu for a malaria test at the Koribondo Community Health Center near Bo, Sierra Leone. Holding the child is her is her mother, Umu Koroma. At rear is health worker Ishmael Karoma.

Health worker Juliana Koroma (right) takes a blood sample from Issata Jusu for a malaria test at the Koribondo Community Health Center near Bo, Sierra Leone. Holding the child is her is her mother, Umu Koroma. At rear is health worker Ishmael Karoma.

“We are teaching the volunteers to understand how malaria is transmitted in language they can understand. There is a large population that is illiterate. Many also only speak Creole and Mende,” he said.

United Methodist conference leaders are getting the word out through live radio broadcasts, congregations and word of mouth in the days leading up to the launch.

Jusu is just one of a team of United Methodists in Sierra Leone passionate about making this campaign a success. They do not want to leave one family behind.

Jusu was born in Bo and raised by his uncle, who was a staunch Methodist. The uncle was a strong influence on a boy who grew up to start a HIV/AIDs unit for the United Methodist Sierra Leone Conference and dedicate his life to serving others.

“I want people to know what transmits malaria, what the malaria mosquito looks like, what they can do to prevent the disease. I want them to know about personal hygiene. I want them to know not to keep stagnant water, to close their toilets and to seal their bedrooms so the mosquito doesn’t have any breathing space.”

Imagine No Malaria – People in pews and big donors net millions to fight malaria

Matilda Ndanema displays the insecticide-treated mosquito net she received from the United Methodist Church's Imagine No Malaria campaign in 2010 at her home in Bumpe, near Bo, Sierra Leone.

Matilda Ndanema displays the insecticide-treated mosquito net she received from the United Methodist Church’s Imagine No Malaria campaign in 2010 at her home in Bumpe, near Bo, Sierra Leone.

As the Imagine No Malaria campaign enters its home stretch, United Methodists can look with satisfaction at $60 million already raised in gifts and pledges, and with hope and confidence toward surpassing the $75 million goal by the end of 2015.

Most of the money raised has been from grassroots efforts like bake sales, car washes and children donating birthday money. “Now, gifts of $1 million are coming in, and there are opportunities for more of these,” said Pittsburgh Area Bishop Thomas Bickerton, chairperson of the executive committee for Imagine No Malaria.

“This is what it means to be connectional,” said Bishop Bickerton. “Everyone in the pews contributes to the success of Imagine No Malaria. This is selfless, joyful giving. This is generosity that will save thousands of lives. I am so proud of my United Methodist brothers and sisters in Christ.”

Habibatu Fugbawa sits with two of her children in front of the insecticide-treated mosquito net she received in 2010 from the United Methodist Church's Imagine No Malaria campaign at her home in Bumpe, Sierra Leone.

Habibatu Fugbawa sits with two of her children in front of the insecticide-treated mosquito net she received in 2010 from the United Methodist Church’s Imagine No Malaria campaign at her home in Bumpe, Sierra Leone.

Malaria has been killing for thousands of generations, but improved prevention, sanitation and healthcare have all but eliminated it from the developed world. Despite this progress, however, malaria continues to kill at a rate of almost one death every minute in Africa — millions of children infected each year.

These needless deaths have galvanized United Methodists, particularly those who have been to Africa and have witnessed the extent of malaria’s devastation. Donnellson United Methodist Church in Iowa has fewer than 50 people in worship on Sundays, yet, on average, church members have donated $187 per person.

Donnellson United Methodist Church’s pastor, the Rev. Peggy Ellingson, said her church’s active mission focus has led members to visit Africa several times.

Imagine No Malaria - Global Partners Standing Together“It really hits home,” Ellingson said. “That connection, that real connection of people who have been there, have seen it, have done it, the end result of their making a difference and then sharing it with the rest of the group, really makes all the difference in the world.”

The United Methodist Church has operated hospitals and clinics in Africa for more than 200 years. Imagine No Malaria takes decades of good work a step further. The campaign allows the church to offer a comprehensive plan that relies on full partnerships with African communities, focusing equally on four efforts: prevention, treatment, education and communications.

“Where better can you make a difference than channeling through The United Methodist Church to attack a global issue?” asked Jerre Stead. “There’s not a lot of places that allow investments like leadership gifts to maximize the return, and (the church is) clearly one. It’s an excellent one.”