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Impatience and What’s Behind It – Patience

Patience“Look at the prophets,” James advises, as examples of godly suffering. But a lot closer to home for most of us is an example of how to go about waiting.

For that, James declares, “consider the farmers.”  They can’t hurry the growth of their crops. But neither can they take the summer off. There’s work to be done in the fields as they wait for the harvest to ripen.

Interact with God’s Word

James 5:7-8, James 5:10-11

  1. Can the farmer force his crops to ripen any faster? Can we hasten the Lord’s return?
  2. Are you eagerly looking for His return? Why (v. 8) should you take courage?
  3. How does patient waiting for the Second Coming apply to other kinds of waiting?
  4. James cites Job (v. 11) as an example of patience. Why does Job-like endurance deserve “great honor”?
  5. How did Job’s trust finally end in good (see Job 42:10-17)?
  6. Might you, like Job, never have God explain to you the reason for frustrations or delays you experience?
  7. But can you, like Job, ultimately bank on God’s character, described here as “full of tenderness and mercy”?

Spend Time in Prayer: Ask God for humility and hope that will transform your approach from irritable impatience to steady endurance.

James 5:7-8, James 5:10-11

7 Dear brothers and sisters, be patient as you wait for the Lord’s return. Consider the farmers who patiently wait for the rains in the fall and in the spring. They eagerly look for the valuable harvest to ripen. 8 You, too, must be patient. Take courage, for the coming of the Lord is near.

10 For examples of patience in suffering, dear brothers and sisters, look at the prophets who spoke in the name of the Lord. 11 We give great honor to those who endure under suffering. For instance, you know about Job, a man of great endurance. You can see how the Lord was kind to him at the end, for the Lord is full of tenderness and mercy.

Prayer for the Week: Thank You, Lord, for Your infinite patience. Grant me a composure of spirit that reflects Your character.

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